Tales O Kirrie Toon

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Local Government

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

The Post Office Directory of 1846 gives full detail of the public offices, dignatories and financial institutions of the day.

Charles Lyell of Kinnordy, locally superior to everyone, heads the bill. 


The Baron Officer and Town's Drummer of the time was George Milne, who was ''of adamant ... made of sterner stuff [than his predecessor' but one, Tam Barnett. The gangrels came to be closely watched which, perhaps, was just as well for the town's sake as their own.'

Between Tam and George had come John Wilkie, who had blotted his copybook, and on being deposed had refused to lay down his baton of office, till he earned a fortnight's imprisonment in the Tolbooth. In view of his former office he was permitted the privilege of having the use of a pirn wheel to 'enliven the dullness ' of incarceration. 



By 1878, Slater's Dictionary shows an impressive expansion in the number and range of municipal employees, though the office of  Town Drummer seems to have been replaced by Town Crier. George Milne had died in 1875, and Peter Lamb held the now post, but was not given the recognition of a listing as a Municipal Official.